PSPS overview


A Public Safety Power Shutoff, also called a PSPS, occurs in response to severe weather. We turn off power to help prevent wildfires and keep communities safe. Multiple factors are at play when deciding to turn off your power and we take the decision very seriously.


pole manAlthough your location may not be in a high fire-threat area or an area experiencing high winds, your power may be shut off if your business relies on a line that runs through an area with severe weather. Or, a nearby business may be served by a different line than the one that serves you and in a PSPS, your power could stay on while a business across the street may have power turned off.


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PSPS timeline: what to expect

When we need to temporarily turn off power for safety, you can expect the following:

Severe Weather Forecasted

Severe Weather Forecasted

When: Up to a week before


What: Our weather specialists forecast potential severe weather.

PSPS Outage Watch Notifications

PSPS Watch Notifications (outages likely)

When: Two days before, one day before (if possible)


What: We notify you if you are in an area that may be affected by a PSPS. We let you know the potential estimated power shutoff start time and restoration time.

PSPS Outage Warning Notification

PSPS Warning Notification (outages required)

When: Several hours before


What: We notify you if you are in an area that will be affected by a PSPS. We let you know the potential estimated power shutoff start time and restoration time.

Power Shutoff

Power Shutoff

When: During severe weather


What: Power is shut off to affected areas to prevent wildfire.

When: Weather has improved and inspections and restoration activities have begun What: Our power crews inspect power lines to restore power to affected communities as quickly and safely as possible. W

Updates and Inspections

When: Weather has improved and inspections and restoration activities have begun


What: Our crews inspect electric lines to restore power to affected communities as quickly and safely as possible. We notify you daily about the estimated time of power restoration through notifications, social media, local news, radio and our website.

PSPS Power Restored

PSPS Power Restored

When: Within 24 hours after severe weather has passed


What: Power is restored to affected communities.

Emergency preparedness and planning

PSPS planning maps

PSPS planning maps are intended to provide a general estimate regarding potential locations that may be affected by a PSPS.

Critical facility information

Learn more about additional assistance and advance planning for services essential to public safety.

Energy assessments and efficiency

Help identify energy waste and get recommendations to start saving energy and money.

Onsite power considerations

Learn about financial incentives for customers installing battery storage or generation equipment.

Weather resources

Learn the role weather plays in a Public Safety Power Shutoff and see PG&E's 7-day PSPS potential.

School resources

Find materials to support emergency preparedness education, suitable for students in kindergarten through sixth-grade.

More resources