Urgent Alert

Find or report electric outages

Tools and tips to find and report outages

Find and report outages. Map updates every 15 minutes.

emergency alert icon  If you smell natural gas or suspect an emergency, leave the area now and call 9-1-1. 

emergency alert icon  If you see downed powerlines, stay away. Don’t exit your car or home. Call 9-1-1. Then call PG&E at 1-877-660-6789.

 

24-hour Customer Service Line: 1-877-660-6789

24-hour Power Outage Information Line: 1-800-PGE-5002 (1-800-743-5002)

Two options to report an electric outage

  1. Enter an address in the search box on the outage map.
  2. If we are not aware of your outage, you will see the option to "Report an outage".

Mesure reliability

SAIDI performance results

  1. Select "Report an outage" in the navigation.
  2. On the "Report outage" page, enter your address in the "Outage address" box.
  3. If we are not aware of your outage, you will see the option to "Report an outage".

Map territory

Three options to find an electric outage

  1. Enter an address in the search box.
  2. Select the correct address from the drop-down selection.

SAIFI performance results

  1. Select the "City/County Search" toggle.
  2. Enter a city or county in the search box .

  1. Move around the map.
    • The size and area of the outage are indicated by color and shape
  2. Find your outage. 
  3. Click on the outage icon to get the details.

Outage type

What to do if you see a downed powerline

 
1. Don't go near a downed powerline

Downed powerlines can kill you. Never touch them. Always assume that a fallen powerline is live. Follow these guidelines:

  • Don't touch the downed powerline with your hand or any object
  • Don't touch anything in contact with a downed powerline, including a car or another person.
  • Keep children and pets away from fallen electric lines.
  • Don't drive over a downed powerline.
  • Call 9-1-1 immediately to report a downed powerline.

 

2. Stay safe if a downed powerline touches your car

If your vehicle comes in contact with a downed powerline:

  • Stay inside your car. The ground around your car may be energized.
  • Sound the horn. Roll down your window. Call for help.
  • Warn others to stay away. Anyone who touches the equipment or ground around your car can be injured.
  • Call 9-1-1 from your car, if possible.
  • Do no exit the vehicle. 
    • Wait until a firefighter, police officer or PG&E worker tells you it’s safe.

If your car is in contact with a downed powerline and a fire starts, exit the vehicle:

  • First, remove loose items of clothing.
  • Hands at your sides, jump clear of the vehicle. Make sure you are not touching the vehicle when your feet hit the ground.
  • Once clear of the vehicle, keep your feet close together. Shuffle away from the vehicle without losing contact with the ground.

 

3. Do not use Mylar® balloons and toys near powerlines
  • If a Mylar® balloon or toy is caught in a powerline, contact PG&E now. Do not go near the powerline.
    • Mylar balloons, also called foil balloons, are made from plastic nylon sheets with a metallic coating. They cause thousands of power outages every year when they come into contact with powerlines or circuit breakers.    
  • Report issues with the PG&E Report It mobile app.
    • Do not use Mylar balloons, kites and remote-control toys near overhead powerlines.
    • If you must use Mylar balloons, tie them down. If they float into powerlines, they can cause outages and worse. 

 

4. Look up and live
  • Be aware of powerlines above when lifting a ladder or long-handled tool.
  • Avoid fallen or dangling powerlines. Do not touch the lines. Call 9-1-1 now.
  • Do you see tree branches or limbs near powerlines? Use PG&E Report It.

Get updates about a specific outage

  • Go to the "Outage Status" box
  • Select "Get Alerts".
  • Select how you'd like to be contacted: 
    • Text
    • Email
    • Phone call
  • Select where and when to reach you

More outage resources

Report a non-emergency

Report a broken streetlight, energy theft and other non-emergencies.