IMPORTANT COVID-19 NOTICE


The Pecho Coast Trail is currently closed to the public as the state and the nation continue to struggle with containment of COVID-19. The continued safety of the public, as well as the health and well-being of our docents and trail managers is a top priority for PG&E. Our docents and trail managers are required and vital to maintaining safe access to the Pecho Coast Trail, ensuring safety of the trail system itself.


PG&E will continue to monitor the COVID-19 situation and will provide public outreach when we’re able to reopen the trail based on guidance from both the State of California and the County of San Luis Obispo. We appreciate your patience as we work to find a solution.


Thank you for your cooperation

Enjoy panoramic views of the California coastline


pecho coast trail logo

The Pecho Coast Trail is located on the south end of PG&E property and accessed through Avila Beach. Choose from two guided hikes, the 3.75-mile roundtrip hike to Point San Luis Lighthouse and the 8-mile roundtrip hike to Rattlesnake Canyon.

This scenic coastal trail is a joint partnership between PG&E, the California Coastal Commission and the Port San Luis Harbor District. The hike takes visitors up to the Port’s Historic Point San Luis Lighthouse. Visitors can enjoy a short docent-led tour of the lighthouse by paying a $10 admission fee.

Pecho Coast Trail has been open for guided hikes since 1993 and is known for its panoramic views of Avila Beach. Hikers are treated to stunning landscapes while learning interesting facts from docent naturalists. Topics include the local history of the Avila Beach area and information on the Northern Chumash tribe who once inhabited the area.

The trail is home to many native plants and animals and interesting geological formations. Wildflowers are prevalent along the trail during the spring months, and California gray whales can be seen spouting offshore.

For more information about the history of the trail, the lands and the lighthouse, visit Diablo Canyon trails history.



Know before you go


The Pecho Coast Trail has a diverse terrain and can pose risks to hikers, including changing weather conditions heat exposure and an elevation change. The trail runs along steep cliffs and coastal bluffs with narrow dirt trails, steep grades (up to 45 percent), crumbling earth and possibilities of other strenuous hiking conditions.

Pecho Coast Trail is located on a rare, undeveloped area of coastline with poison oak, thistles and other vegetation that can cause discomfort. There can be wildlife in the vicinity of the trail, as well as rattlesnakes and ticks.


pecho coast map