Prevent injuries and property damage from drought-damaged trees

Four years of drought conditions have caused many trees in our communities to die or become extremely unhealthy. Lack of water has weakened them, making them susceptible to disease and infestations of harmful insects such as bark beetles. These compromised trees are a hazard to people and property since they can fall on power lines and homes without warning and cause injuries, property damage, power outages and wildfires.


To prevent such incidents, we have are continuing increased tree inspections as well as tree pruning and removal. We are also asking you to help by inspecting trees on your property and throughout your community.


PG&E's 2016 drought response

As record drought conditions intensify the millions of dying trees and bark beetle infestation across California, we are continuing to partner with CAL FIRE and local Safety Councils providing funds to help prevent wildfires within your community.


Our drought work to reduce the potential for wildfire includes:

  • Working year round to manage the effects of the drought and the increasing fire risk
  • Managing over 55 million trees on two million properties in our 70,000 square-mile service area
  • Inspecting 72,000 miles of line with redundant patrols to identify and remove dead, dying trees that pose a hazard in high-risk fire areas
  • Using emerging aerial LiDAR (Light detection and ranging) imagery patrol technologies to proactively detect hazardous trees near lines
  • Shared funding for CAL FIRE and Fire Safe Councils to continue preventive fire safety work in local communities
  • Extension of CAL FIRE's public safety campaign to help increase education about vital fire safety measures and the bark beetle infestation

2016 Expanded Debris and Wood Management Program

An expanded debris and wood management is now available for qualifying customers in the following counties: Amador, Calaveras, El Dorado, Fresno, Kern, Madera, Placer, Tulare and Tuolumne. In all other counties PG&E will consider wood and debris management on a case-by-case basis.


Download the Debris Management Program brochure to learn more (PDF, 58 KB)


Take these steps to stay safe

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Report dead, dying or diseased trees near power lines

Some signs of a dead, dying or diseased tree are bare branches, brown leaves or needles, a cracked or leaning trunk and trails of fine sawdust near the tree base indicating an insect attack. If you identify such a tree and it is close to a power line, don't attempt to remove or prune it. Please stay away and call us at 1-800-743-5000.

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Request a free, temporary service disconnection

If you notice tension on your service drop (line to home or business), please call us at 1-800-743-5000 to ask for a free, short term disconnection. This will allow you to prune without the risk of electrical contact.

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Mind the lines: Know what's overhead

While primary lines carry the highest voltage, secondary lines and service drops carry enough voltage to cause injury or death. When performing tree pruning or vegetation removal, always look up first and stay clear of all power lines. Learn more about Electric Safety

Find out more about clearing vegetation to create defensible space around your home. Visit readyforwildfire.org.

Be aware of power line locations

Pruning trees next to high voltage power lines is extremely dangerous. Only people who receive special training are permitted to work within 10 feet of lines according to the California Occupational Safety and Health Administration (Cal/OSHA).

Pruning trees next to high voltage power lines is extremely dangerous. Only people who receive special training are permitted to work within 10 feet of lines according to the California Occupational Safety and Health Administration (Cal/OSHA).